Creativity Corner

March 3, 2009

Computers and resources at home

Filed under: Uncategorized — beachbum87 @ 7:52 pm

 “My purpose is to convince teachers of English studies, composition, and language arts that we must turn our attention to technology and its general relationship to literacy education. On the specific project to expand technological literacy, we must bring to bear the collective strength of our profession and the broad range of intellectual skills we can muster as a diverse set of individuals. The price we pay for ignoring this situation is the clear and shameful recognition that we have failed students, failed as humanists, and failed to establish and ethical foundation for future educational efforts in this country.”Literacy and Technology Linked, Page 5

When I began to read this article, I found it fascinating that President Clinton and VP Al Gore put forth the Technology Literacy Challenge. I realized that as a child at this time, my school was partially involved with the nationwide challenge to make all students technologically literate.

The excerpt from the essay that I chose discusses the importance of a technological literate nation. I feel that the greatest way to improve technology literacy is by supplying computers for learning. Public schools have taken large steps within the last few years by acquiring computers for students to use and teaching technology in the classroom. Many teachers continually attend workshops to further their own knowledge so they can teach their students by having an up-to-date awareness of technology.However, I feel that the most basic and effective way to ensure a student’s technology literacy is by supplying the resources they need: computers. There are still many families that cannot afford to provide a computer for their children at home. I know from personal experience because when I was a kid my mom struggled to get me one.

Teachers place pressure on kids to do work that involves computer research. Although libraries and computer labs are available to most, I believe that if a student had a computer right at their fingertips it would help them become even more technologically literate. Maybe instead of schools spending so much money on the resources they have in the building, they could use that money to help out families in financial need. A student is more likely to take advantage of something at their own house then to stay after school hours and work in a library or lab. Kids are at school enough as it is…I bet most of them aren’t taking advantage of the schools resources. I just remember being in high school, having ten thousand computer labs, and maybe going to it once or twice for a mini class fieldtrip. For this reason, perhaps a change should be made.

Going back to the excerpt, it says “The price we pay for ignoring this situation is the clear and shameful recognition that we have failed students, failed as humanists, and failed to establish and ethical foundation for future educational efforts in this country.”  Does anyone think this is a bit harsh, or do you think that ignoring the issue really does fail students and also fails to establish a foundation for ”future educational efforts”?

Does anyone else feel that schools spend too much money on types of technology that isn’t being used to their full potential?Any other ideas for improving literacy in technology besides providing more at-home resources to students?Thoughts on fixing this issue? (If you think it even is an issue). Other ideas/comments/good stufffffff?

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