Creativity Corner

March 5, 2009

Academic Creativity

Filed under: Uncategorized — kateraney @ 11:15 pm

I found this article on recognizing Academic Creativity in the classroom.  I think it is helpful. I found it at: http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content/academic_creativity.html

 

What Is Meant By Academic Creativity?

Academic creativity is a way of thinking about, learning, and producing information in school subjects such as science, mathematics, and history. Few experts agree on a precise definition, but when we say the word, everyone senses a similar feeling. When we are creative, we are aware of its special excitement.

Creative thinking and learning involve such abilities as evaluation (especially the ability to sense problems, inconsistencies, and missing elements); divergent production (e.g., fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration); and redefinition. Creative learning is a natural, healthy human process that occurs when people become curious and excited. In contrast, learning by authority requires students to use thinking skills such as recognition, memory, and logical reasoning–the abilities most frequently assessed by traditional tests of intelligence and scholastic aptitude. Children prefer to learn in creative ways rather than just memorizing information provided by a teacher or parents. They also learn better and sometimes faster.

Three questions illustrate the difference between learning information provided by an adult or textbook and creative learning:

  1. In what year did Columbus discover America? (The answer, 1492, requires recognizing and memorizing information.)
  2. How are Columbus and an astronaut similar and different? (The answer requires more than memorization and understanding; it requires students to think about what they know.)
  3. Suppose Columbus had landed in California. How would our lives and history have been different? (The answer requires many creative thinking skills including imagining, experimenting, discovering, elaborating, testing solutions, and communicating discoveries.)
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